Monthly Archives: November, 2015

Your Mission: Hire Veterans

Soldier salute. Silhouette on sunset sky. War, army, military, guard concept.

A few months ago I was on the hunt for a job, a task that I’m sure many of you are familiar with. It’s not easy. After a few months of searching you begin to wonder if there is something on your resume that is glaring up at companies and holding them back from hiring you…and you ask yourself, what could be the problem?

I am a Navy Reservist, so for a while I thought that my reserve status was holding companies back from hiring me. Maybe they had seen a military movie and thought I’d be screaming my head off at employees like a drill sergeant or maybe they immediately associate a service member with deployment. But then I thought to myself, that’s ridiculous. Why wouldn’t they want to hire me? Sure, there is a chance that I could deploy. But if I am put on orders for deployment, I would be enhancing my skills in a professional field, a field that they would be hiring me in.

It made me question whether or not employers see the value in hiring and employing service members. So, I put together a list of five attributes that a service member brings to your organization:

1) Leadership skills

Service members are bred to become leaders. We are instilled to accept responsibility for getting things done,  manage cross-functional team communication and promote a culture of hard work by setting the example.

2) Work well under pressure

Military training assists members to flourish when working under pressure. A key trait necessary for working in high-stress career fields in the civilian world.

3) Attention to detail

If you miss one tiny detail during a mission, you are putting lives at risk. The military workplace puts service members into scenarios where they are challenged to pay attention to every detail. Making a conscious effort to understand causes instead of just the effects translates well into the corporate world, because details that fall through the cracks can cost a company time and money.

4) Teamwork

We work in teams. That’s just what we do. Never leave a man behind. Veterans instill a sense of team pride and cohesiveness. Teamwork builds trust and trust builds speed. Working together, we are able to achieve organizational goals and success faster.

5) Great work ethic

Military members have an incredible work ethic, and make personal sacrifices to accomplish the mission. We don’t let the team down. We get our jobs done, and we do it well, regardless of the organizational demands.

While there are other traits that could be mentioned, this short list is great to keep in mind when hiring and employing a Veteran because they all have the potential to promote a culture of teamwork and growth.

So now I ask you, what benefits has your organization seen in hiring veterans and service members? Let us know your feedback.

For more information about employers who have benefited from hiring veterans or if you are a veteran seeking employment go to the ESGR website.

MichellePelisseroPhoto


Written by:

Michelle Pelissero
Communications Coordinator
governmentresource.com


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Overcoming Over-Confidence

As part of my MBA program at Texas Tech (Wreck ‘em), I am taking a Business Analytics course. Recently, we did an exercise in class where we had to rank how certain we were about answers to random trivia questions (80% sure the answer is A, etc.). It looked like this…

Question 1
Answer: A or B
Confidence in your answer: 50-100%
(Obviously, if it is less than 50% you would choose the other answer.)

After we completed the questionnaire, the instructor called out the correct answers and we tallied the results to confidentshow which we answered correctly/incorrectly and how accurate we were when we guessed our confidence level in our answer. Some of you may already realize this… but we were ALL over-confident. Everyone in the entire room, law school graduates, CPA’s, CEO’s, future CEO’s, and one Managing Director of Development and Collaboration were all more positive that we knew the correct answer than we really did. (I think my statistic was something like when I say I am 70% sure, I am only correct 30% of the time. Scary right??)

Fortunately, for this defeated group of students, this was exactly the point the instructor was trying to prove. We rely on gut instinct and intuition, and we are wrong… A LOT. Then, once the facts do show that we are indeed incorrect, we actually rationalize our error (typically using extenuating circumstances beyond our control). We say things like, “that would have been successful, but we ended up having to switch gears to focus on something else” or “it really was a great idea, but the customer base ended up needing something else…” or “nobody could have predicted that downturn in the economy.” Next, we repeat this situation, time and time again.

So, how do we overcome this over-confidence? Well, the answer is really not that black and white. We canUntitled-2-01 make use of metrics, data, and algorithms, but we have to be careful. As Mark Twain once said, there are “lies, damned lies, and statistics” but, numbers can be powerful and algorithms are more accurate than our gut feeling (seriously, it is true, read this). When you track data over a period of time, find trends, form algorithms and analyze, you are able to look at results in a more unemotional state that lets you make truly informed decisions without your own preconceived notions, desires and bias weighing in. This type of decision-making can also lead to greater efficiency organization wide, because instead of multiple people using debate and brainstorming (or worse, group think), you can implement tools and processes for making quick and accurate decisions.

That said the POWER of over-confidence is actually very beneficial to an organization. Yes, you heard that correctly! When looking back over the course of history, we see inventions and innovations like the first car, first flight, and medical advancements. It is clear that without some creative humans setting lofty goals, brainstorming, and trying again, and again, and again (despite the overwhelming statistics showing they would fail), we would not have progressed as a society like we have. Innovation is the key when starting new initiatives and staying on the leading edge (being in the 16%). Especially in local government, it would be detrimental to eliminate or even stifle the creativity that over-confidence brings to the organization. Sometimes success is not about what would be supported through numbers and data, because only a human can make a JUDGMENT call.

All of this is to say, while we all think we are more correct than we really are, it is important to acknowledge and understand and use it to our advantage. Leaders in local government face an even more unique challenge, because while most are driven to serve the public and create a learning organization, they are also focused on streamlining operations and overall efficiency. As leaders, we must find the right balance to utilize the over-confidence to spur innovation, while being aware of the impact over-confidence has on accurate decision-making.

My boss, Ron Holifield, often says, “I would rather try ten things and only succeed at five than to try three things and succeed 100% of the time.” This is a truly innovative approach and has allowed the entire company to take risks and think outside the box.

So, what are you doing in your organization to overcome over-confidence? Are you using it to spur innovation?

Krisa

Written by:
Krisa Delacruz

Managing Director of Development and Collaboration
governmentresource.com

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Why Are Assessments Important?

Good question.  Let’s start with a very brief definition of Employee Assessments.  Employee Assessments are products thatTestYouCanDoIt evaluate employee behavior, typically by asking respondents to answer questions about how they perceive themselves at work.  There are several very effective products available on the market today, both in paper and online formats.

Now…why bother?  Can’t we just assign employees the work and expect them to get it done?  Sure, you could try that.  Another idea is to discover more about the behavior styles of your individual employees, and maximize the positive behavior traits of each individual employee.

For example, say you have an employee named Sally.  Sally works in your finance department.  Say that Sally exemplifies the classic introverted personality style.  Sally appears painfully shy, is often soft-spoken, and prefers to work solo rather than in a team environment.  She is a number cruncher, a paperwork guru, and a powerhouse auditor.

Now, let’s pretend the City Council has requested an oral presentation of the recently completed fiscal audit.  Did I also mention that City Council meetings are televised and broadcast over and over again on the City TV channel!  Would Sally be your first choice in conducting that presentation?

I’d guess not.

Sure, Sally knows the material inside and out, she was involved in every aspect of the audit and knows the findings, but is that the only consideration in deciding who should present the findings?  Would Sally even WANT to do that presentation?  giphyWould she freeze like a deer in the headlights in front of the dais?  Would she embarrass herself?  The department?  How would the Council Members perceive the audit itself if the presenter of the material isn’t able to clearly and concisely articulate the findings?  Can’t you see Sally up there, stammering and red-faced, uncomfortable and sweating under the lights and the cameras?  Not a good look.

Another idea would be to capitalize on Sally’s expertise more effectively by having her prepare the presentation to the Council.  She could write the talking points.  She could prepare handouts and documentation to support the findings.  She could also spend time discussing the audit report with the selected presenter beforehand so that the presenter is fully versed in the material.   Sally could play a vital role in the presentation while being behind the scenes.

Spending time to learn about your employees and their behavior styles gives you the opportunity to learn what their comfort zones are.  It allows the employees to learn more about themselves, more about their co-workers, more about how they interact with each other.  Assessing employee behavior also provides a common language for all employees to speak, teaches respectful ways to communicate with each other.  Assessing employee behavior styles also gives leaders a clear understanding of how they can better plan work assignments.team

Assessing employee behavior can lead to increased employee retention, improved relationships, and an overall more successful work group.   All of these things open up the lines of communication between you and each of your employees and that’s ALWAYS a good thing!

Participants of the upcoming Parks and Recreation Leadership Summit in Albuquerque, New Mexico, can learn more about Assessments during my session “Understanding Personality Styles”.   Now…who’s ready to go on camera?

JessicaMatson2

Written by: 
Jessica Matson
Member Collaboration Manager, Central & SE Texas Region
governmentresource.com

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